Water Resources Policy Articles in Maine Policy Review

2012

The Path to Sustainable Water Resources Solutions

Authors: Peckenham, John, David Hart, Sean Smith, Shaleen Jain, and Whitney King

Maine Policy Review 21(1): 46-57

Water is essential both to human survival and to the ecosystems on which people depend. Although Maine is blessed with abundant water sources, managing them is crucial for both short and long-term uses. The authors describe the varying time and spatial scales involved in managing water resources, pointing out that policy decisions made at one time can have far-reaching consequences. They provide illustrations of water-resource projects from Maine’s Sustainability Solutions Initiative, ranging in size from Sebago Lake to vernal pools on individual properties.

2011

Historical Perspectives on Resource Use in Food Systems

Authors: Jemison, John, Beal, Amanda

Maine Policy Review 20(1): 163-171

No one would deny that industrial agriculture and fishing have been highly productive—but at what cost? This article explores the historical development and contemporary impact of food production on the environment, availability of water and other resources, energy, food safety, and even our waistlines

2008

The Clean Water Act in Maine: Goals and Financing

Author: Fisk, Andrew

Maine Policy Review 17(1): 26-39

Andrew Fisk gives an overview of the history of the federal Clean Water Act and of Maine’s efforts to improve the quality of the state’s lakes, rivers and streams. He describes how the Clean Water Act works and how its provisions are implemented. While the quality of Maine’s water bodies has improved greatly, much work still remains to be done in the areas of rain and stormwater runoff and mercury pollution, and in having adequate financing and infrastructure over the long term.

1994

Water Resources Conference: Watershed Planning in Maine

Author(s): Houtman, Nick

Maine Policy Review 3(2): 99-101

Watershed planning in Maine suffers from several problems that were identified during a water resources conference held at the University of Maine in April 1994. A brief summary of key conference findings is reported here.

1992

The Safe Drinking Water and Clean Water Acts: A Small Community View

Author(s): Levy, Steve

Maine Policy Review 1(2): 65-68

The Safe Drinking Water Act of 1986 and the Clean Water Act Amendments of 1991 present significant financial and technical challenges to municipalities in Maine and other states as they struggle to meet compliance standards. Steve Levy, executive director of the Maine Rural Water Association, offers a view of the effects of these requirements on rural communities.

The Safe Drinking Water and Clean Water Acts: A Large City View

Author(s): Branch, Chris

Maine Policy Review 1(2): 69-73

The Safe Drinking Water Act of 1986 and the Clean Water Act Amendments of 1991 present significant financial and technical challenges to municipalities in Maine and other states as they struggle to meet compliance standards. Chris Branch, public works director and city engineer for Lewiston, presents a large community perspective.

1991

Water Management by Local Governments

Author(s): Houtman, Nick

Maine Policy Review 1(1): 103-111

For most of the era since 1960, when environmental policy and resource policy have been central public issues, the focus of public debates on those policies was at the federal and state levels. Now, more and more of the decisions and policies that will determine the quality of life for citizens are being made at the local level. Issues that have historically been local prerogatives are increasingly identified as crucial for effective environmental policy and for insuring “quality of life.” Those local decisions are often constrained by a wide variety of state and federal policies on environmental policy and resource use, but effective management of quality of life issues by local governments will clearly require more than reluctant reaction to rules and deadlines imposed from above. Nick Houtman examines the match between the increasing demands for local action on environment-related issues and the local resources available to meet those demands, focusing on local water planning.