Trade Policy Articles in Maine Policy Review

2016

The Trans-Pacific Partnership’s Potential Economic Impact on Maine

Authors: Catherine Reilly deLutio, Philip A. Trostel

Maine Policy Review 25(2): 16-30

The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) is a free-trade agreement (FTA) between 12 Pacific-Rim countries. If passed, it would be the largest FTA in which the United States participates. Catherine Reilly deLutio and Philip Trostel assess the potential impact of the TPP’s tariff reductions and quota increases on Maine’s economy. The results suggest that the TPP would likely generate slight increases in overall measures of Maine’s economy. The benefits would be relatively small and spread across the population.

 

2008

The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative: What It Means for Maine

Authors:    Bogdonoff, Sondra

Maine Policy Review 17(2): 143-145

The federal government has been slow to act on curbing greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to climate change and on reducing dependence on petroleum and other fossil fuels. In the absence of federal leadership, Maine and other states have enacted policies and practices to try to address these issues. Sondra Bogdonoff’s article discusses the 10-state Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI), in which Maine participates, the first regional program in the U.S. to address climate change. RGGI is a cap-and-trade system aimed at reducing CO2 emissions, which are “capped” at allowable levels. Power generators can buy and sell allowances. Under RGGI, each state must sell or auction off 25 percent of its allowances and use the proceeds to promote energy efficiency or new clean energy technologies

2003

Old Wine in New Bottles? An Overview of Two Centuries of Free Trade between the United States and Canada

Authors:    See, Scott W.

Maine Policy Review 12(1): 14-21

On February 5, 2003 the Maine International Trade Center and University of Maine Canadian American Center co-sponsored a day-long forum on the challenges and opportunities of free trade between Canada and the United States. This article presents the edited remarks of Scott See who gave audience members a whirlwind overview of the history of Canadian-American free trade from the Revolutionary War era up to passage of the Free Trade Agreement in 1989.

Trade and Border Security as Political Issues in Canada

Authors:    Cody, Howard

Maine Policy Review 12(1): 22-29

On February 5, 2003 the Maine International Trade Center and University of Maine Canadian American Center co-sponsored a day-long forum on the challenges and opportunities of free trade between Canada and the United States. In this article, edited from his presentation at this forum, Howard Cody begins with passage of the Free Trade Agreement and brings readers up to the present day, where trade and border security concerns have become inextricably combined. Cody argues that Canadians will not persuade Americans to distinguish between the two concerns and, consequently, that Canadians will eventually accept some sacrifice in national sovereignty in order to maintain the benefits of their current trade and investment relationship with the United States.

1998

The Importance of Maine’s Economic Ties with Canada: Some Thoughts Related to the East-West Highway

Authors:    Mueller, Richard E.

Maine Policy Review 7(1): 56-68

Whether to build an east-west highway across central Maine has been widely debated in recent months and, regardless of where one stands on the issue, all agree it is important to study the idea further. In this article, Richard Mueller addresses Maine’s economic linkages with Canada and assesses how an east-west highway would affect them. He focuses on cross border traffic flows, inter-provincial truck activity, Canadian-American trade, and tourism, concluding that there is little doubt an east-west highway would bring economic benefits to northern and central Maine. Yet he cautions policymakers to consider the investment carefully. Highways are two-way streets where economic benefits can enter as well as leave the state, and determining the magnitude of the costs and benefits requires further study.