Government and Politics in Maine Policy Review

2019

The Myth of Electability: What It Really Takes for Women to Win

Authors: Cain, Emily

Maine Policy Review 28(2): 6-8

Drawing on her experience in the Maine Legislature and current role as executive director of EMILY’s List, in this Margaret Chase Smith Essay, Emily Cain shares insight into the myth of electability and examples of the important impact women have made over the past 35 years politically and how they have changed our political landscape along the way.

The Independent Party Panacea?

Author: Shea, Daniel M.

Maine Policy Review 28(1): 8-10

In this commentary, Daniel M. Shea considers whether the addition of another party would redeem our faith in elections and cure the ills of governance.

Local Politics from Away

Author: Bourque, Matthew

Maine Policy Review 28(1): 6-7

Transplanted Mainer and college student Matthew Bourque reflects on the strength and character of Maine’s political tradition.

The Independent Party Panacea?

Author: Shea, Daniel M.

Maine Policy Review 28(1): 8-10

In this commentary, Daniel M. Shea considers whether the addition of another party would redeem our faith in elections and cure the ills of governance.

Maine’s 2018 Election: Bonds Continue to Hold

James Melcher

Maine Policy Review 28(1): 74-75

This commentary follows up on Melcher’s article on bond issues from 2016, and it finds that these and other past tendencies in Maine bond voting held true once again in 2018.

2018

ENACT-ing Leadership at the State Level: A National Educational Network for Engaged Citizenship in State Legislatures

Authors: Glover, Robert W.; Cole, Kathleen; Owens, Katharine

Maine Policy Review 27(1): 22-26

The Educational Network for Active Civic Transformation (ENACT) is a nationwide network that serves as a hub for the pedagogical efforts of educators in 16 different states, with the ambitious goal of having an ENACT Faculty Fellow in all 50 states. However, ENACT courses go a step further engaging students directly in experiential learning exercises designed to affect policy change by working with policy advocacy groups, preparing policy briefs, engaging in strategic outreach and messaging, and meeting directly with policymakers in their state capitals to advocate for political change. In this paper, we argue that state politics represents a fruitful, yet often neglected, space for the development of political leadership skills. Accordingly, we will present ENACT as a pedagogical model for empowering students, enhancing their capacity for political leadership. Yet we also remain attuned to localized variation in the policy-making environment and state political culture.

2016

What Bonds Hold? An Examination of Statewide Bond Referenda in Maine and Other States

Author: James P. Melcher

Maine Policy Review 25(2): 53-62

Since 1990, Maine has held votes on statewide bond referenda than any other state. In this article, James Melcher tackles three main questions: (1) How often do voters approve bond proposals in Maine, and how does this compare to other states? (2) Are some types of bond referenda more likely to pass than others? (3) Does a bond’s placement on the ballot make it more, or less, likely to pass?

Why Did No One See this Coming? How Did It Happen?: The 2016 Presidential Election

Sandy Maisel

Maine Policy Review 25(2): 63-65,

Sandy Maisel discusses the results of the 2016 presidential election.

Climate Policy 2015: Reports from the Congressional Trenches

Authors:        Tisher, Sharon; Mills, Peter

Maine Policy Review 25(1): 72-76

The bipartisan commentary by Peter Mills and Sharon Tisher urges action in Congress to address the problem of climate change, and stems from interviews with Senator Susan Collins, Senator Angus King, and Congresswoman Chellie Pingree regarding their climate-related initiatives in 2015.

2014

Maine as a Bulwark of Democracy

Authors:        Mills, Peter

Maine Policy Review 23(2): 8-11

Politics Then and Now: Introduction

Authors:        Barringer, Richard; Palmer, Kenneth

Maine Policy Review 23(2): 12-17

This article is an introduction to several articles and excerpts published in this issue of Maine Policy Review based on a series of related lectures. One set of lectures, “Politics Then and Now, in Maine and the Nation,” was presented by the Muskie School and Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Southern Maine in the fall of 2013, and the other was the William S. Cohen lecture held at the University of Maine. Most of the speakers are prominent public office holders who were asked to address the issue of political polarization and dysfunction, comparing how politics was played in the past with the current situation, and discussing what Maine can offer based on experiences here. Series organizers Richard Barringer and Ken Palmer provide an overview of the lectures and a summary of some of the common themes.

Worldviews in Conflict

Authors:        Allen, Tom

Maine Policy Review 23(2): 18-26

This article is an edited version of a lecture given in a lecture series, “Politics Then and Now, in Maine and the Nation,” presented by the Muskie School and Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Southern Maine in the fall of 2013. Speakers were asked to address the issue of political polarization and dysfunction, comparing how politics was played in the past with the current situation, and discussing what Maine can offer based on experiences here. Tom Allen analyzes the significance of conflicting worldviews in explaining the modern political climate in the U.S.

Ten Comparisons, Then and Now

Authors:        King, Angus

Maine Policy Review 23(2): 27-35

This article is an edited version of a lecture given in a lecture series, “Politics Then and Now, in Maine and the Nation,” presented by the Muskie School and Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Southern Maine in the fall of 2013. Speakers were asked to address the issue of political polarization and dysfunction, comparing how politics was played in the past with the current situation, and discussing what Maine can offer based on experiences here. Angus King describes a number of factors contributing to the dysfunctional state of politics now, with one of the most fundamental being conflict over the size and scope of government.

The Importance of Listening

Authors:        Mitchell, George

Maine Policy Review 23(2): 36-36

This article is an excerpt of a lecture given in a lecture series, “Politics Then and Now, in Maine and the Nation,” presented by the Muskie School and Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Southern Maine in the fall of 2013. Speakers were asked to address the issue of political polarization and dysfunction, comparing how politics was played in the past with the current situation, and discussing what Maine can offer based on experiences here.

It’s Not the System, It’s the Voters

Authors:        Frank, Barney

Maine Policy Review 23(2): 37-37

This article is an excerpt of a lecture given in a lecture series, “Politics Then and Now, in Maine and the Nation,” presented by the Muskie School and Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Southern Maine in the fall of 2013. Speakers were asked to address the issue of political polarization and dysfunction, comparing how politics was played in the past with the current situation, and discussing what Maine can offer based on experiences here.

Productive Partisanship

Authors:        Mitchell, Elizabeth “Libby”

Maine Policy Review 23(2): 38-38

This article is an excerpt of a lecture given in a lecture series, “Politics Then and Now, in Maine and the Nation,” presented by the Muskie School and Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Southern Maine in the fall of 2013. Speakers were asked to address the issue of political polarization and dysfunction, comparing how politics was played in the past with the current situation, and discussing what Maine can offer based on experiences here.

Governing for the People

Authors:        Curtis, Kenneth

Maine Policy Review 23(2): 39-39

This article is an excerpt of a lecture given in a lecture series, “Politics Then and Now, in Maine and the Nation,” presented by the Muskie School and Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Southern Maine in the fall of 2013. Speakers were asked to address the issue of political polarization and dysfunction, comparing how politics was played in the past with the current situation, and discussing what Maine can offer based on experiences here.

Politics Then and Now: Looking Forward

Authors:        Fried, Amy; Fredette, Ken; Dill, Cynthia

Maine Policy Review 23(2): 40-41

This article is an excerpt of a concluding panel presentation from a lecture series, “Politics Then and Now, in Maine and the Nation,” presented by the Muskie School and Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Southern Maine in the fall of 2013. Speakers were asked to address the issue of political polarization and dysfunction, comparing how politics was played in the past with the current situation, and discussing what Maine can offer based on experiences here.

Enough is Enough

Authors:        Cohen, Bill; Simpson, Alan

Maine Policy Review 23(2): 42-42

This is an excerpt from the 2013 William S. Cohen Lecture delivered at the University of Maine, featuring former Secretary of State Bill Cohen and Senator Alan K. Simpson, on “The State of Our Nation: Hardball vs Civility.” The full version was published in “Politics Then and Now, in Maine and the Nation,” edited by Richard Barringer and Ken Palmer

2012

Cleaning House? Assessing the Impact of Maine’s Clean Elections Act on Electoral Competitiveness

Authors:        Powell, Richard J.

Maine Policy Review 19(2): 46-54

Does full public financing of legislative elections make races more competitive? Richard Powell analyzes the impact of the Maine Clean Elections Act (MCEA) on Maine House and Senate elections since its passage in 2000. Using statistical analysis, he concludes the MCEA has not significantly increased competitiveness, even though candidates have been able to rely substantially less on private contributions and the financial disparity between candidates has decreased significantly. Powell suggests that analysis of the Maine case will be useful as the nation and other states consider public-financing laws compa­rable to the MCEA.

2010

Maine’s Paradoxical Politics

Authors:        Palmer, Kenneth

Maine Policy Review 19(1): 26-34

Kenneth Palmer’s article, based on his 2009 University of Maine College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Maine Heritage Lecture, discusses the para­doxes of Maine’s politics that often draw national attention. He notes how these paradoxes have contrib­uted to the state’s having a “creative and effective political system.” Maine politics are dynamic in nature, with parties loosely hung together, governors winning by pluralities rather than majorities, and significant turnover both in members and parties in legislative districts. Palmer suggests that Maine’s political leaders find themselves as centrists, primarily because they want to find practical solutions to difficult problems.

Why Margaret Still Matters

Authors:        Sterling-Golden, Martha

Maine Policy Review 19(1): 78-79

In this commentary, Martha Sterling-Goldman reflects on the complexities of women in public life, and why it is important to prepare women to fully engage in political life. She says we must train a generation of women and men who think about power in a different way.

Bite-Sized Democracy: The Virtues of Incremental Change

Authors:        Mills, Peter

Maine Policy Review 19(2): 8-9

In the Margaret Chase Smith Essay, Peter Mills draws on his long years of public service in both houses of the Maine Legislature to reflect on the values of gradual, incremental change in public policy.

2008

“These Very Impelling Reasons Against My Running”: Maine Women and Politics

Authors:        Cathcart, Mary

Maine Policy Review 17(1): 8-9

In the Margaret Chase Smith Essay Mary Cathcart reflects on women in politics and describes her own trajectory in coming to serve in the Maine House of Representatives and the Maine Senate. She discusses the upcoming (2009) launch of the Maine NEW Leadership program at the University of Maine, a national education program for college women.

The Boundaries of the Role of Women in Political Life

Authors:        Flynn, Erin

Maine Policy Review 17(1): 10-11

Each year, the Margaret Chase Smith Library sponsors an essay contest for Maine high school seniors. We feature here Erin Flynn’s 2008 first place prize-winning essay. Students were asked to assess whether the ideals of the 19th Amendment, granting voting rights to women, have been fulfilled and to discuss the social and cultural barriers remaining for women to overcome in the pursuit of political power, long after legal barriers to equal participation have been removed.

2005

The 2005 BRAC Process: The Case to Save Maine’s Bases

Authors:        Langhauser, Derek P.

Maine Policy Review 14(1): 38-48

Derek Langhauser gives a postmortem of Maine’s response to the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Commission’s announcement of imminent closure of bases in Portsmouth-Kittery, Brunswick and Limestone. Although Maine did not “win back” the Brunswick facility, Maine rescued the facilities in Portsmouth-Kittery and Limestone, secured additional resources for the Bangor Air National Guard and Bangor Naval Reserve Center, and was granted an expansion of the Limestone accounting center. Maine’s response to the BRAC Commission’s original announcement is testament to the extraordinary capacity of the states’ people to work together in times of crisis.

Maine Gov. James B. Longley: Don Quixote and Sir Thomas More, with a Dash of Machiavelli—An Appropriate Political DNA for the Day?

Authors:        McGregor, Jim

Maine Policy Review 14(1): 50-55

Jim McGregor, Governor James B. Longley’s executive assistant during his term of office from 1975 to 1979, provides his reflections about Longley the man and the era in which he won election against all political odds to become Maine’s first independent governor. While many historians and State House observers concentrate on the “confrontational Longley,” McGregor sheds new and hitherto private light on the multifaceted Governor Longley and suggests he may have been a man ideal for the time during which he served.

2004

Rejuvenating American Politics

Authors:        Leathe, Becca

Maine Policy Review 13(1): 8-11

To promote Senator Margaret Chase Smith’s firm belief in the importance of civic engagement, on the eve of the 2004 presidential elections the Margaret Chase Smith Library invited Maine high school seniors to submit essays proposing ways to encourage young people to become more involved in the political process. We feature here Becca Leathe’s first place prize-winning essay, which draws upon historical examples as well as personal experiences and opinions.

The Other Iraq

Authors:        Myers, Wayne

Maine Policy Review 13(2): 8-10

In the Margaret Chase Smith Essay, Wayne Myers discusses the Iraqi Kurds and their uniquely functional society within Iraq.

2003

Campaign Finance Reform, Free Speech and the Supreme Court

Authors:        Langhauser, Derek

Maine Policy Review 12(3): 28-35

In December 2003, the United States Supreme Court upheld all the key provisions of the Bipartisan Campaign Finance Reform Act (BCRA) of 2002. In their 5-4 decision, the justices deferred broadly to the limitations set by Congress on unregulated “soft money” and “issue ads” in political campaigns. Derek Langhauser, who worked in Senator Olympia Snow’s office as counsel in McConnell v FEC, as this case was called, gives a legal history of the challenge of balancing Congress’ interest in protecting the integrity of elections with the Constitution’s competitive rights of free speech and association. He describes in detail the Supreme Court’s decision, the implications of the decision, and the role of the Court in representative democracy.

2002

Term Limits, the Standing Committees, and Institutional Response

Authors:        Moen, Matthew C.; Palmer, Kenneth

Maine Policy Review 11(1): 12-24

Through citizen initiative in 1993, Maine passed a term limits bill that now prevents legislators with eight years of consecutive service from seeking reelection. Although touted as a means of eliminating careerism in public service and as a means of bringing fresh blood and new policy initiative to Augusta, many now question whether limits on service have hampered legislative efficiency through the loss of experienced leadership and institutional memory. Moen and Palmer examine the impact of term limits on the legislature’s standing committees. While noting adverse impacts such as heavier workloads, they also find an institution hard at work to adapt, with leadership seeking new ways to improve operations and to orient new members to a rapidly changing environment.

Gubernatorial Power and the Struggle for Executive Efficiency in Twentieth Century Maine

Authors:        Mills, Paul H.

Maine Policy Review 11(1): 86-89

In this commentary, Paul Mills discusses the balance between the executive and legislative branches of Maine state government in the twentieth century, noting that from 1986 to the time of the writing of this commentary (2002), the state’s governors have had a different political affiliation than the legislatures elected to serve with them. He remarks that even as the mechanics of government have become more efficient through reforms, Maine people have created and enforced a system that puts the governor and legislature at odds, hampering their ability to move forward.

Maine Code of Election Ethics

Authors:        Gallant, Gregory P.

Maine Policy Review 11(2): 8-9

In the Margaret Chase Smith Essay, Gregory Gallant discusses the voluntary Maine Code of Election Ethics, sponsored and organized by the University of Maine’s Margaret Chase Smith Policy Center and the Margaret Chase Smith Library in Skowhegan. The code is a voluntary effort designed to elevate political discourse in Maine’s federal and gubernatorial elections. Gallant reflects on the ways in which this code reinforces Margaret Chase Smith’s recognition of the critical role played by civic engagement in American society.

The Perils of Voice and the Desire for Stealth Democracy

Authors:        Theiss-Morse, Elizabeth

Maine Policy Review 11(2): 80-88

This article is an address given at the May 2002 Maine Town Meeting sponsored by the Margaret Chase Smith Library in Skowhegan. Elizabeth Theiss-Morse takes issue with each of the alleged beneficial effects of increased participation and deliberation in politics. She presents evidence from her own research with colleague John Hibbing that suggests a more participatory democracy does not necessarily result in better decisions, a better political system or better people. Rather, most Americans would prefer not to have to participate in politics at all. Theiss-Morse explains where this view comes from and, in the end, argues for a civic education process that better prepares young people for the gritty divisiveness of our democratic system.

The Project of Democracy

Authors:        Keyssar, Alexander

Maine Policy Review 11(2): 90-99

This article is an address given at the May 2002 Maine Town Meeting sponsored by the Margaret Chase Smith Library in Skowhegan. Alexander Keyssar chronicles the advances and contractions of democratic political rights in American history. While on balance, this is a story of progress, it is not, Keyssar argues, unilinear, nor one that is completed. Although arguably late for the world’s “greatest democracy,” by the 1970s the United States had achieved universal suffrage. Today, however, the tug between democratic and anti-democratic forces continues. The contest is no longer over voting rights but over the procedures and rules governing elections (i.e., election reform and redistricting). Keyssar argues we must continue to fight for the expansion of democratic rights; it is an ongoing project, one in which we will never be finished.

1999

What Would Margaret Chase Smith Have Made of Bill Clinton’s Tragi-Comedy?

Authors:        Calhoun, Charles

Maine Policy Review 8(1): 8-9

In the Margaret Chase Smith Essay, Charles Calhoun reflects on President Bill Clinton’s presidency, with its accomplishments and his personal flaws. He speculates on what Margaret Chase Smith would have thought about Clinton.

Closing the Class Gap in Civic Participation

Authors:        Fried, Amy

Maine Policy Review 8(2): 8-9

In the Margaret Chase Smith essay, Amy Fried discusses the implications of increasing class stratification on civic participation in the United States. She suggests that public schools can play an important role in improving citizen engagement.

Performance Government in Maine: The Effort to Make State Government More Efficient, Responsive, and Accountable

Authors:        Clary, Bruce; Wechsler, Barton

Maine Policy Review 8(2): 10-19

Maine has embarked upon a major initiative to change how government conducts its business. At the federal level this initiative has been called the National Performance Review. Spearheaded by Vice President Al Gore, its goal is reinventing government so it performs better, costs less, and gets results. Today, many states have undertaken initiatives similar to the National Performance Review and the general term used to describe these activities is “performance government.” Although performance government may apply to a wide range of administrative changes, it most typically applies to three reform initiatives: strategic planning, performance budgeting, and performance contracting. Maine has been reinventing its government systems to include each of these components. This two-part symposium on performance government begins with this article by Bruce Clary and Barton Wechsler of the Muskie School of Public Service. Clary and Wechsler provide an overview of efforts to reinvent government and the context for Maine’s current initiatives.

Performance Government: A Roundtable Discussion

Maine Policy Review 8(2): 21-29

Many states have undertaken initiatives similar to the National Performance Review; the general term used to describe these activities is “performance government.” Although performance government may apply to a wide range of administrative changes, it most typically applies to three reform initiatives: strategic planning, performance budgeting, and performance contracting. Maine has been reinventing its government systems to include each of these components. This roundtable discussion, cofacilitated and coedited by Bruce Clary and Barton Wechsler, features eight individuals who have been helping to shape the reinvention of Maine state government, including Carolyn Ball, Charles Colgan, Merton G. Henry, Elizabeth Mitchell, Don Nicoll, and Janice Waldron. Through their unique vantage points, they illustrate the complex set of factors—political, organizational, and technical—that have an impact on government reform and the prospect for meaningful change.

Maine’s Dubious Odyssey into the Funding of Local Government

Authors:        Mills, Peter

Maine Policy Review 8(2): 38-47

Despite recent reforms to Maine’s school funding, State Senator Peter Mills argues that the formula will not be truly fixed until the state addresses the municipal side of property tax inequities. To that end, he prescribes some tough medicine for Maine policymakers to relieve the disproportionate tax burden on the state’s service center communities. Among other things, he suggests we consider repealing some of the exemptions that exclude a quarter of all property from taxation; permitting service centers to adopt local option taxes; and injecting the state’s limited revenue sharing funds into just those municipalities with intolerable tax burdens that remain unmanageable through local resources. Moreover, Mills asserts that the state “cannot relieve inequity by trying to carpet bomb the property tax.” He calls for an end to expensive and unfocused measures that sprinkle the state’s revenue too broadly. With income tax rates among the highest in the nation (and a sales tax soon to be reduced), Mills argues that Maine’s failure to address property tax inequities squanders the state’s limited resources and places the state’s future economic competitiveness in jeopardy.

1998

Bridging the Discontent

Authors:        Mathews, David

Maine Policy Review 7(1): 8-9

Digital Democracy Is Coming to the Maine Legislature

Authors:        Carleton, Joseph

Maine Policy Review 7(1): 30-42

Although Maine’s information infrastructure is several years ahead of the nation in development, Maine ranks only 41st out of 50 states in its “digital democracy,” that is, its use of new telecommunications and information technologies to permit greater citizen access to laws, legislators, and the state’s legislative processes. State Rep. Joseph Carleton outlines changes underway in the Maine Legislature that will result in greater digital democracy throughout the state. Through advances such as e-mail, the Internet, and other digital forms of communication, Carleton envisions new ways of doing business both for legislators and citizens.

Missing the Point about Campaign Election Ethics

Authors:        Hunt, Kathryn; Gallant, Greg

Maine Policy Review 7(1): 74-75

1996

One Question at a Time, Please!

Authors:        Spruce, Chris

Maine Policy Review 5(2): 4-5

In the Margaret Chase Smith Essay, Chris Spruce addresses the conundrum of public referenda, championed by many as the most direct form of democracy and criticized by others for creating winners and losers without the traditional give and take of American politics. He reviews the recent history of public referenda in Maine, including the recent clear-cutting initiative. Perhaps we lose more than we gain when we oversimplify complex public issues with inherently conflicting values biases.

Ethics and the Election of 1996

Authors:        Ballard, Steve

Maine Policy Review 5(3): 4-5

In the Margaret Chase Smith Essay, Steve Ballard discusses the Maine Code of Election Ethics: its origins, its successes and failures, and how it can be improved. Pioneered by the Margaret Chase Smith Library in Skowhegan, the code is a unique response to a national problem—making representative government work.

1995

The Search for Predictability: A City Manager’s Perspective on Intergovernmental Relations

Authors:        Stevens, Thomas

Maine Policy Review 4(1): 5-11

Thomas Stevens’ perspective on intergovernmental relations has been shaped particularly by his experience as town manager in Limestone, Maine, as he watched the federal government attempt to close Loring Air Force Base. The closing of Loring was an especially traumatic experience for central Aroostook County. Not surprisingly, the nature of intergovernmental relations and the economic future of the region are high on Tom Stevens’ list of concerns. In a recent interview with Maine Policy Review, he argued for a new partnership among the three levels of government characterized by stability and predictability.

Maine in the 104th Congress: Life without Mitchell

Authors:        Palmer, Kenneth T.; Taylor, G. Thomas

Maine Policy Review 4(1): 33-42

For many Mainers, the significance of the last election had little to do with the Republican “sweep” throughout the nation, but had much to do with the retirement of Senator George Mitchell. This article summarizes Senator Mitchell’s most critical policy contributions and the results of his influence at the state and national levels. His absence from Congress presents the currentMainedelegation with a new set of challenges. These issues are explored, in part, from the broader perspective ofMaine’s history in Congress.

1994

The 1994 Elections: The Maine Vote in National Perspective

Authors:        Moen, Matthew C.

Maine Policy Review 3(3): 47-50

The 1994 elections at the national and state level resulted in significant changes all across the political landscape. Matthew Moen analyzes the nature of that change and its implications for Maine.

Expectations and the 1994 Maine Elections

Authors:        Potholm, Christian P.

Maine Policy Review 3(3): 50-53

The 1994 elections at the national and state level resulted in significant changes all across the political landscape. Christian Potholm analyzes the nature of that change and its implications for Maine.

1992

In Search of a Strong Agenda: An Interview with Kenneth M. Curtis

Authors:        Curtis, Kenneth

Maine Policy Review 1(3): 1-9

In an interview with Maine Policy Review, Kenneth Curtis, the former governor, former chairman of the Democratic National Committee, and former U.S. ambassador to Canada, shared his insights into the civic and political life of Maine and the nation. Not surprisingly, Curtis, currently president of Maine Maritime Academy, argues that many attitudes about the ineffectiveness and the unresponsiveness of government could be overcome by strong leadership from the executives of federal and state governments.

Reflections on Citizenship: Thinking About Power as Interaction

Authors:        Hill, Leslie I.

Maine Policy Review 1(3): 24-28

The steady decline of participation in many areas of public life suggests that we may be overlooking power as not only a source of the problem, but also as a critical part of the solution. Leslie Hill argues that to revive concepts of citizenship and democratic participation enshrined in the language of the nation’s founding, we ought to rethink conventional ideas about power as control and domination and, in the alternative, view power as interaction. She also suggests that we need to adopt new approaches to civic education that include this concept of power as interactive politics.

Repairing the Three-legged Stool of Ethics: A Conversation with Rushworth Kidder

Authors:        Kidder, Rushworth

Maine Policy Review 1(3): 29-36

As founder and president of the two-year-old Institute for Global Ethics (in Camden, Maine), Rushworth Kidder concerns himself not only with chronicling the moral dissonance that characterizes contemporary American society, but also with identifying and trying approaches that address this discord. He is someone who is troubled by what is, but is full of hope for what can be. Earlier this year, Maine Policy Review visited Kidder and queried him about his work and the state of the nation’s political values and institutions. This article is an edited version of his comments.