Skip to main navigation Skip to site navigation Skip to content

Maine Policy Review

Energy Policy Articles in Maine Policy Review

2017

Maine Energy Planning Roadmap— Energizing Maine’s Future

Authors: Smith, Lisa; Marks, Jeff

This article describes the Maine Energy Planning Roadmap, which is scheduled for release in January 2018. The Maine Governor’s Energy Office (GEO), with the guidance of a diverse and accomplished steering committee and funding provided by the US Department of Energy (DOE), is developing the Roadmap.

2012

Research for the Sustainable Development of Tidal Power in Maine

Authors:        Johnson, Teresa; Zydlewski, Gayle B.

Maine Policy Review 21(1): 58-65

Generating electricity from Maine’s substantial tides has been a dream for generations. Today, the state is poised for a new era in sustainable tidal-power development. A pilot project is already underway in the Cobscook Bay/Western Passage area near Eastport and Lubec. Tidal-power development presents technical, environmental, and social challenges, however, and the authors discuss how the Maine Tidal Power Initiative is working to develop a cooperative framework that integrates stakeholders, developers, and policymakers to tackle some of these challenges.

Place-based Approaches to Alternative Energy: The Potential for Forest and Grass Biomass for Aroostook County

Authors:        Johnston, Jason; Cardenas, Soraya

Maine Policy Review 21(1): 66-75

Teams at the University of Maine Presque Isle and the University of Maine at Forth Kent are engaged in evaluating the potential for forest and grass biomass energy in Aroostook County, funded through Maine’s Sustainability Solutions Initiative. The article discusses how this potential is being evaluated and the possible ways in which expanding grass and wood biomass might benefit farmers and residents of The County. It suggests that using some of Maine’s farmland for fuel might be sustainable with appropriate management and with consideration for potential environmental and socioeconomic drawbacks

Attitudes toward Offshore Wind Power in the Midcoast Region of Maine

Authors:        Acheson, James

Maine Policy Review 21(2): 42-55

Given the likelihood of the development of offshore wind farms in Maine and the increasingly politicized nature of discussions about wind power in general, there is a need for more systematic information on Mainers’ opinions about offshore wind power. In this article, James Acheson provides information on the range of public opinion about offshore wind power based on a survey of fishermen, tourism-related business owners and coastal property owners in Midcoast Maine. He assesses the accuracy of some public concerns and discusses the broader policy issues raised about offshore wind development.

Biofuels Development in Maine: Using Trees to Oil the Wheels of Sustainabilty

Authors:        Noblet, Caroline L.; Teisl, Mario F.; Farrow, Katherine H.; Rubin, Jonathan

Maine Policy Review 21(2): 56-66

As national standards require increased use of renewable transportation fuels by 2022, Maine is positioned to be a leader in wood-based cellulosic ethanol production and use. Caroline Noblet, Mario Teisl, Katherine Farrow, and Jonathan Rubin consider Mainers’ willingness to accept and use biofuels. They document the current level of consumer knowledge and behavior and identify factors (environmental, economic, and energy security) that may assist or constrain drivers from purchasing biofuels.

2011

Getting What We Pay For (and Other Unintended Consequences): An Overview of Federal Agricultural Policy

Authors:        Hayes, MaryAnn

Maine Policy Review 20(1): 66-76

The reauthoriza­tion of the Federal Farm Bill in 2012 means that activity is heating up to reform U.S. agricultural, nutrition, and energy policy. Mary Ann Hayes provides an overview of the Farm Bill’s history, its intended and unintended consequences, and what can be hoped for in 2012.

2010

Development in the Gulf of Maine: Avoiding Geohazards and Embracing Opportunities

Authors:        Brothers, Laura L.; Kelley, Joseph T.; Maynard, Melissa Landon; Belknap, Daniel F.; Dickson, Stephen M.

Maine Policy Review 19(1): 46-57

Mapping for marine-spatial planning is crucial if Maine is to safely develop its offshore resources, espe­cially wind and tidal energy. The authors focus on shallow natural gas (methane) deposits, an important and widespread geohazard in Maine’s seafloor. They describe the origin, occur­rence, and identification of natural gas in Maine’s seafloor; explain the hazards associated with these deposits and how to map them; and discuss what Maine can learn from European nations that have already developed their offshore wind resources. Because the U.S. gives states a central role in coastal management, Maine has the chance to be proactive in delineating coastal resources and demarcating potential seafloor hazards.

Public Collaboration in Maine: When and Why It Works

Authors:        Kenty, Diane; Gosline, Ann R.; Reitman, Jonathan W.

Maine Policy Review 2010 19(2): 14-30

Government by itself cannot address all complex public policy issues. The authors write that “public collaboration” can alter the discourse on divisive local, regional, and state issues. Public collaboration is a process in which people from multiple sectors (government, business, nonprofit, civic, and tribal) work together to find solutions to problems that no single sector is able to resolve on its own. The authors describe the common features of effective public collaboration and provide detailed case studies and analysis of five recent examples of public collaboration in Maine.

2008

Challenging Climate Change

Authors:        Snowe, Olympia J.

Maine Policy Review 17(2): 8-11

Introduction: Ask Not… Voices from Maine Addressing Climate Change and Energy

Authors:        Townsend, Sam

Maine Policy Review 17(2): 12-15

Understanding the Global Energy Industry Is Key to Meeting Maine’s Energy Challenge

Authors:        Wilson, Elizabeth A.

Maine Policy Review 17(2): 24-38

Dependence on petroleum has global consequences with regard to supply constraints, energy security, and economic impacts, along with major consequences for climate change and other environmental problems. Maine is at a particular disadvantage due to its reliance on home heating oil and transportation fuels in this rural state. In this article, Elizabeth Wilson analyzes the global petroleum industry and the challenges and solutions ahead for the U.S. and Maine as we seek to reduce dependence on fossil fuels and develop other cleaner and cost-effective energy sources.

What We Can Expect from the Federal Government to Address Climate Change and Energy Independence

Authors:        Cote, Adam

Maine Policy Review 17(2): 46-50

Adam Cote highlights major federal energy and climate initiatives that the new administration and Congress are likely to try to enact. Many of these initiatives could be important for Maine, particularly policies and funding that promote clean energy, energy efficiency, conservation, and “green-collar” jobs.

The Energy Challenge–Gone Today, Back Tomorrow: Maine’s Key Role

Authors:        Hastings, William H.

Maine Policy Review 17(2): 40-45

World energy trends suggest that increased demand for fossil fuels is likely to continue, even as producers are not replacing what is being used. William Hastings argues that in spite of this, Maine is poised to potentially become an energy leader in the near future. He points out that a surprising number of new projects are increasing the diversity of the state’s energy supply.

Confronting Global Warming: Maine’s Multi-Sector Initiatives, 2003–2008

Authors:        Littell, David P.; Westerman, Gary S.; Burson, Malcolm C.

Maine Policy Review 17(2): 52-65

David Littell, Gary Westerman and Malcolm Burson describe Maine’s pioneering efforts in reducing greenhouse gas emissions, promoting energy efficiency, and developing less carbon-intensive and more sustainable energy sources. They discuss in particular the goals and accomplishments of the state’s Climate Action Plan and Maine’s participation in several multi-state and regional efforts, including the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI).

Workforce Investment in Maine’s New Energy Economy

Authors:        Brown, Robert E. II; Ginn, Clifford M.

Maine Policy Review 17(2): 80-83

Building a new energy economy based on increasing efficiency and developing new energy sources requires the development of a trained workforce. Robert Brown and Clifford Ginn point out that Maine could be in an excellent position to take advantage of “green economy” workforce funds and programs if the state develops the needed policies, institutions, industry partnerships and practices that have been successful elsewhere.

Tapping the Potential of Energy Efficiency to Create Greater Economic Security for Maine

Authors:        Voorhees, Dylan

Maine Policy Review 17(2): 85-94

Energy efficiency is cheaper than any current sources of power or fuel. Maine has started to develop some energy-efficiency programs such as Efficiency Maine and MaineHousing’s weatherization efforts, but the state lags behind other states in the region. Dylan Voorhees addresses barriers that Maine needs to overcome in order to tap its energy-efficiency potential. He suggests an expanded strategy, including planning for the long term, leveraging private investments and taking advantage of the private sector, extending efficiency programs to all fuels, and consolidating current energy-efficiency planning and budgeting

Efficiency Maine: Investing in Energy Savings and Knowledge

Authors:    Vrabel, Tim

Maine Policy Review 17(2): 95-98

Tim Vrabel provides an overview of Efficiency Maine, which has programs for business and residential users, technical training, and commercial and agricultural energy auditing.

Landfill: Gas to Energy

Authors:    Zaitlin, Sam

Maine Policy Review 17(2): 105-106

If Maine is to reduce its reliance on fossil fuels, and the associated greenhouse gas emissions, it is important to develop both new sources of energy and new technologies to better access existing sources. The generation of electricity from gas produced by landfills is already underway. Sam Zaitlin describes Maine’s first waste-to-energy project located at Casella’s Hampden landfill.

Maine’s Wind Resource: A Source of Energy and Economic Engine

Authors:    Parker, Jackson A.

Maine Policy Review 17(2): 101-104

If Maine is to reduce its reliance on fossil fuels, and the associated greenhouse gas emissions, it is important to develop both new sources of energy and new technologies to better access existing sources. Large scale wind power generation is already in operation in a few places in the state, with many new projects in various stages of planning and implementation.

BioEnergy and the Forest Products Industry in the Atlantica Region

Authors:    Olesen, Thor

Maine Policy Review 17(2): 107-110

Wood has been in use for centuries as an energy source and holds potential for new and innovative uses, ranging from pellets for residential and commercial heating to the creation of liquid biofuels (cellulosic ethanol and diesel) and new types of clean-burning solid products. Based on a recently completed study, Thor Oleson’s article analyzes the prospects for bioenergy development in the Atlantica region (Maine, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia).

Tidal Energy Development

Authors:    Ferland, John

Maine Policy Review 17(2): 111-113

John Ferland discusses tidal power, an energy source that holds great future potential for Maine. He notes that a new technology, tidal in-stream energy conversion (TISEC) is reliable, predictable, and projected to be as cost-effective as any other means for producing electricity.

Transportation and Climate Change

Authors:    Rubin, Jonathan

Maine Policy Review 17(2): 115-119

The transportation and residential sectors in Maine use a large proportion of fossil fuels, primarily petroleum products, and are a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions. Jonathan Rubin’s article on transportation reviews mechanisms by which petroleum demand and greenhouse gas emissions can be reduced, emphasizing state and federal legislation to achieve these goals. He describes ways in which transportation systems will be affected by and have to adapt to climate change.

Connecting Residential Energy Efficiency and Carbon Emissions Reductions: MaineHousing’s Carbon Market Project

Authors:    McCormick, Dale; Van Hook, Lucy

Maine Policy Review 17(2): 120-126

The transportation and residential sectors in Maine use a large proportion of fossil fuels, primarily petroleum products, and are a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions. Dale McCormick and Lucy Van Hook in their article on MaineHousing’s carbon market project observe that energy use in buildings is the “next frontier” for emissions reductions. MaineHousing’s innovative program is aimed at generating and selling “emissions reduction credits” in the carbon market, through verified savings from weatherization and other energy measures. The funds generated can in turn be used to provide further weatherization assistance, as well as low-interest loans to homeowners for weatherization or installation of more energy-efficient systems.

Size Matters: Notes on Green Design Process and Goals

Authors:    Renner, Richard K.

Maine Policy Review 17(2): 127-129

Richard Renner presents architectural design principles that should be employed to minimize buildings’ “loads,” i.e., demands for resources and energy, and to maximize efficiency.

The 90/10 Rule: Energy Use Improvements at Prime Tanning

Authors:    Kuhns, Michael

Maine Policy Review 17(2): 134-135

Fairchild Semiconductor’s Efforts to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Authors:    Rouillard, Joel H.

Maine Policy Review 17(2): 136-138

Oakhurst Dairy: Taking on the Carbon Challenge

Authors:    Bennett, Stanley T. II

Maine Policy Review 17(2): 139-140

The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative: What It Means for Maine

Authors:    Bogdonoff, Sondra

Maine Policy Review 17(2): 143-145

The federal government has been slow to act on curbing greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to climate change and on reducing dependence on petroleum and other fossil fuels. In the absence of federal leadership, Maine and other states have enacted policies and practices to try to address these issues. Sondra Bogdonoff’s article discusses the 10-state Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI), in which Maine participates, the first regional program in the U.S. to address climate change. RGGI is a cap-and-trade system aimed at reducing CO2 emissions, which are “capped” at allowable levels. Power generators can buy and sell allowances. Under RGGI, each state must sell or auction off 25 percent of its allowances and use the proceeds to promote energy efficiency or new clean energy technologies

What One Municipality Has Accomplished: The City of Saco and Its Energy Committee

Authors:    Peaslee, Travis

Maine Policy Review 17(2): 146-148

Travis Peaslee describes the comprehensive efforts of the city of Saco, Maine to reduce energy consumption, increase efficiency, and use new energy sources.

2001

Commentary: Energy Deregulation in Maine

Authors:    Flannigan, David; Weil, Gordon L.; Diamond, Stephen L.; Ward, Stephen G.; Gordon, Kenneth; Connors, Jim

Maine Policy Review 10(1): 12-22

Recent stories from California of power blackouts, utility bankruptcies, and skyrocketing rates have left many wondering whether Maine is going to suffer a similar fate. Like California, Maine has deregulated its electricity supply—an idea that sounded good to many, but which now has some questioning whether consumers will be made better off or worse. To address these issues, MPR asked six analysts to comment on electricity deregulation in Maine. Some address whether Maine is destined to follow in California’s footsteps. Others question whether regional decision making entities, such as the New England Power Pool and the Independent System Operator of New England, sufficiently represent the public interest. Still others address whether there is a future role for public conservation programs. Together, they suggest Maine will not befall the fate of California, but they also suggest that electricity deregulation in Maine may bring its own troubles if we’re not attentive and forward-thinking today.

2000

“The Skeptics Agenda” and What Science Now Says about Global Warming

Authors:    Kates, Robert

Maine Policy Review 9(2): 8-10

In the Margaret Chase Smith essay, Robert Kates discusses global climate change. He notes that there is no longer any doubt that global warming is occurring, caused most likely by increased greenhouse gasses. Costs of preventing warming are mixed, and appropriate timing of such efforts is unknown, but there is no doubt that societal attention is needed for adaptation.

1999

Electric Utility Restructuring: What Does It Mean for Residential and Small Retail Consumers in Maine?

Authors:    Tagliaferre, Lewis; Greenwood, Susan

Maine Policy Review 8(2): 64-72

On March 1, 2000, Maine will offer electric power through open competition, a restructuring that poses both advantages and disadvantages to residential and small retail consumers. While electric restructuring in Maine has been thoughtfully developed, the basic question of whether electricity rates will be lower for the average consumer will remain uncertain for some time. This uncertainty is linked not only to Maine’s electricity rate bidding process but also to potentially oligopolistic national trends. In addition, whether individual consumers achieve savings in their electricity costs will be determined, in part, by their choice of electricity supplier. While some consumers may prefer a higher-cost supplier because of the value-added services that accompany that option, others may make no choice and, by default, receive the standard option—where rates are determined by the Maine Public Utilities Commission (MPUC). In this article, the authors describe the factors that initiated the push toward restructuring, the history of the enabling legislation, and relevant portions of the MPUC’s Consumer Education Program. To consumers, the authors emphasize the importance of aggregation—clusters of buying groups—and detail how the nature of open competition may affect them. In particular, they call attention to the additional services that may be provided by electricity suppliers. Finally, in discussing the implications of deregulation, they lay out the uncertainties that lie ahead for consumers, policymakers, and regulators as Maine opens itself up to competition in the electric power.

1996

Electrical Industry Restructuring: From Policy to Implementation

Authors:    Richert, Evan D.

Maine Policy Review 5(3): 37-43

Both in Maine and nationally, there is continuous evidence of fundamental transformation of the electric utility industry. Maine Policy Review continues coverage of this issue with Evan Richert’s summary of the June 1996, fifth annual conference on Public Utility Regulation and the Environment (PURE). Richert relates the conference discussions to the PUC’s July 1996 draft plan on electric utility industry restructuring and to state government’s efforts to create a comprehensive energy policy for Maine.

1995

Electric Service: The Next Generation

Authors:    Weil, Gordon L.

Maine Policy Review 4(1): 13-19

In the past few years,Maine’s electric utilities have begun to face the forces of competition.Maineis experiencing the effects of a national trend, a shift from a traditional and regulated system to a more innovative and competitive one. Gordon Weil, active inMaineand elsewhere in promoting increased competition in the electric industry, explains the forces for competition. He traces the history of the electric power market from its beginnings as a monopoly, to its present status where all of the forces promoting competition nationally are at play inMaine.

Retail Wheeling: A Closer Look

Authors:    Perkins, William C.

Maine Policy Review 4(1): 19-24

In the past few years, Maine’s electric utilities have begun to face the forces of competition. Maine is experiencing the effects of a national trend, a shift from a traditional and regulated system to a more innovative and competitive one. William C. Perkins analyzes a number of potential costs and risks of full-scale retail wheeling. This article is taken from the author’s presentation at a December 1994 conference entitled ”Retail Wheeling,” sponsored by the Margaret Chase Smith Center for Public Policy’s Project for the Study of Regulation and the Environment.

Electric Market Restructuring: Environmental Considerations

Authors:    Cohen, Armond

Maine Policy Review 4(1): 25-28

In the past few years,Maine’s electric utilities have begun to face the forces of competition.Maineis experiencing the effects of a national trend, a shift from a traditional and regulated system to a more innovative and competitive one. Armond Cohen explores the environmental impacts that are at stake in restructuring and offers some possible solutions. This article is taken from the author’s presentation at a December 1994 conference entitled ”Retail Wheeling,” sponsored by the Margaret Chase Smith Center for Public Policy’s Project for the Study of Regulation and the Environment.

False Competition and Fulfilling the Promise of Retail Wheeling

Authors:    Mitchell, James F.

Maine Policy Review 4(1): 28-31

In the past few years,Maine’s electric utilities have begun to face the forces of competition.Maineis experiencing the effects of a national trend, a shift from a traditional and regulated system to a more innovative and competitive one. James F. Mitchell describes some of the political and financial limits to restructuring and provides suggestions for how to proceed in creating full and fair competition. This article is taken from the author’s presentation at a December 1994 conference entitled ”Retail Wheeling,” sponsored by the Margaret Chase Smith Center for Public Policy’s Project for the Study of Regulation and the Environment.

Regulatory Updates: Maine Public Utilities Commission

Authors:    Townsend, Ralph E.

Maine Policy Review 4(1): 55-57

Evolution of Maine’s Electric Utility Industry, 1975-1995

Authors:    Lee, Carroll R.; Hill, Richard C.

Maine Policy Review 4(2): 17-27

Recent articles in Maine Policy Review have focused on the sweeping changes taking place in Maine’s electric industry. We continue the dialogue with this article by Carroll Lee, Vice President-Operations at Bangor Hydro-Electric Company and Richard Hill, retired University of Maine Professor. Lee and Hill trace the electric industry evolution back 20 years and offer a comprehensive and integrated perspective on how this industry has progressed from a monopoly to one with significant elements of competition.

1994

Regulatory Updates: Maine Public Utilities Commission

Authors:    Townsend, Ralph

Maine Policy Review 3(3): 63-63

Pricing Challenges Facing Maine’s Utility Regulators

Authors:    Welch, Thomas L.

Maine Policy Review 3(1): 9-13

Decisions concerning the pricing of public utilities are rarely made without controversy. Electric utilities have garnered the lion’s share of the attention in recent months because of the rising cost to consumers of electricity, despite surplus generating capacity and relatively cheap power available on the open market. But other regulated utilities—natural gas, telecommunications, and water—also face important pricing issues in the months ahead. The 1994 conference, sponsored by the Margaret Chase Smith Policy Center’s Project for the Study of Public Regulation and the Environment [PURE], explored several of these issues earlier this year. An important Maine perspective on pricing issues was provided by the chairman of the state’s Public Utilities Commission, Thomas L. Welch who cautioned against making public policy decisions that invest too heavily in narrow assumptions about what might happen in the future. Among other things, he underscored the importance of public acceptance of new policies if those policies are to be effective.

Electric Competition and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission

Authors:    Santa, Donald F. Jr.

Maine Policy Review 3(1): 55-60

The pricing of electric power is not only an issue at the state level, it also gathers the attention of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. A major pricing issue now facing FERC involves electric transmission. This reflects increased competition in the electric generation business and is of particular concern in the wholesale electricity market, which is regulated by FERC. As FERC Commissioner Donald F. Santa makes clear in this article, access to transmission lines and the price to be paid for that access are extremely important issues to independent power producers. This article is based on Commissioner Santa’s keynote speech to the PURE ’94 Conference earlier this year.

Regulatory Updates: Maine Public Utilities Commission, Land Use Regulatory Commission

Authors:    Townsend, Ralph; Robinson, Ruth

Maine Policy Review 3(1): 69-75

Retail Competition in the U.S. Electricity Industry

Authors:    Hughes, John P.

Maine Policy Review 3(2): 65-75

The ever-increasing competitive nature of the electric utility business has been lent additional impetus by federal policies that mandate restructuring of the industry. John Hughes, writing from the perspective of large industrial consumers, offers a vision for restructuring the electric utility industry. He frames his vision in response to goals outlines in the California Public Utilities Commission’s proposal to restructure that state’s electric utility industry

Assessing Maine’s ERAM experiment

Authors:    Hudson, Leslie; Seguino, Stephanie

Maine Policy Review 3(2): 77-88

Maine’s utility regulators have occasionally ventured into the uncharted waters of utility regulation reform. Some such efforts have been more successful than others. Leslie Hudson and Stephanie Seguino document the process and outcomes of one such attempt at alternative electric utility regulation, the Electric Revenue Adjustment Mechanism, or ERAM. They endeavor to answer several questions arising from this brief and failed, but interesting regulatory experiment.

Regulatory Updates: Maine Public Utilities Commission

Authors:    Townsend, Ralph

Maine Policy Review 3(2): 95-96

1993

Why Include Eternalities?

Authors:    Raab, Jonathan

Maine Policy Review 2(1): 1-6

“Externalities” are costs imposed on third parties without compensation. Pollution is the archetypical externality. It is the pollution externality that has prompted the emerging national debate over whether public utility regulation should be modified to account for externalities. Jonathan Raab and two other authors [Freeman, Townsend, this issue] discuss the arguments surrounding the externality debate. These three authors earlier presented similar material at a Legislative Institute, sponsored by the Margaret Chase Smith Center for Public Policy’s Project for the Study of Regulation and the Environment, for the Utilities Committee of the Maine State Legislature.

Appropriate Environmental Adders

Authors:    Freeman, A. Myrick III

Maine Policy Review 2(1): 6-9

“Externalities” are costs imposed on third parties without compensation. Pollution is the archetypical externality. It is the pollution externality that has prompted the emerging national debate over whether public utility regulation should be modified to account for externalities. Myrick Freeman and two other authors [Raab, Townsend, this issue] discuss the arguments surrounding the externality debate. These three authors earlier presented similar material at a Legislative Institute, sponsored by the Margaret Chase Smith Center for Public Policy’s Project for the Study of Regulation and the Environment, for the Utilities Committee of the Maine State Legislature.

Are Adders Right for Maine?

Authors:    Townsend, Ralph E.

Maine Policy Review 2(1): 9-13

“Externalities” are costs imposed on third parties without compensation. Pollution is the archetypical externality. It is the pollution externality that has prompted the emerging national debate over whether public utility regulation should be modified to account for externalities. Ralph Townsend and two other authors [Raab, Freeman, this issue] discuss the arguments surrounding the externality debate. These three authors earlier presented similar material at a Legislative Institute, sponsored by the Margaret Chase Smith Center for Public Policy’s Project for the Study of Regulation and the Environment, for the Utilities Committee of the Maine State Legislature.

Bridging the Gap Between Energy and the Environment

Authors:    Flumerfelt, John

Maine Policy Review 2(1): 30-42

Energy and environmental policies have always been intertwined, but the exact nature of those interrelationships is often difficult for the non-technical reader to understand. In an analysis that was originally included in an appendix of the Report of the Maine Commission on Comprehensive Energy Planning, the former director of Maine’s Office of Energy, John Flumerfelt, provides a clear and concise graphical summary of the relation between energy use and air pollution in Maine. His presentation frames the issues in ways that identify important energy and environmental questions for the state.

The Trinity of Transmission Issues: Siting, Access and Pricing

Authors:    Brown, Ashley

Maine Policy Review 2(1): 53-58

Ashley Brown is not only a commissioner of the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio, he is also one of the most widely-respected authorities in the U.S. today on the regulation of electric utilities. He is particularly known for his vocal efforts to forge a more cooperative state-federal relationship in electrical regulation. This article is an edited excerpt from his keynote address at the PURE ’93 Conference.

Understanding the Clean Air Act: Implementation Issues for Electric Utilities

Authors:    Dudley, Susan E.

Maine Policy Review 2(1): 59-67

With the creation of tradable sulfur dioxide permits under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, financial markets have been drawn into the effort to achieve targeted air pollution reductions at least cost. As Susan Dudley explains, financial markets will go well beyond simply providing a place to buy and sell permits. These markets will create a variety of “futures” contracts that will enable utilities to manage the risks of planning future strategies to control pollution.

Maine’s Public Interest Groups: The Industrial Energy Consumers’ Group

Maine Policy Review 2(1): 83-87

The actors in public policy include not only elected and appointed public officials, but also the public interest groups that promote various agendas. To help understand the perspectives of some of these groups, Maine Policy Review plans to profile Maine’s public interest groups in each issue, featuring in this article the Industrial Energy Consumer’s Group (IECG).

Regulatory Updates: At the Public Utilities Commission

Maine Policy Review 2(1): 85-86

Regional Response Options to Global Climate Change

Authors:    Bruce, James P.

Maine Policy Review 2(2): 1-10

Global climate change has garnered some media attention, but has failed to gather the attention of most governmental decision makers and the public. In an effort to advance concerns about the issue, the New England Governors and Eastern Canadian Premiers sponsored a three-day symposium on climate change last May 19-21 in Portland. At the symposium, scientists and public officials from both the U.S. and Canada explored the science of climate change, the potential implications and impact of climate change on this region, and the possible policy responses. James Bruce [and Dean Marriott and Mark Victor, this issue] reflecting the breadth of topics explored at the symposium, argues that the level of public and public policy decision makers’ awareness about climate change issues must be heightened, and decision makers must begin to deal collaboratively with the many serious challenges climate change is presenting to the region.

Climate Change Policy: Mixing Politics and Uncertainty

Authors:    Marriott, Dean

Maine Policy Review 2(2): 10-13

Global climate change has garnered some media attention, but has failed to gather the attention of most governmental decision makers and the public. In an effort to advance concerns about the issue, the New England Governors and Eastern Canadian Premiers sponsored a three-day symposium on climate change last May 19-21 in Portland. At the symposium, scientists and public officials from both the U.S. and Canada explored the science of climate change, the potential implications and impact of climate change on this region, and the possible policy responses. Dean Marriott [and James Bruce and Mark Victor, this issue] reflecting the breadth of topics explored at the symposium, argues that the level of public and public policy decision makers’ awareness about climate change issues must be heightened, and decision makers must begin to deal collaboratively with the many serious challenges climate change is presenting to the region.

Canadian Provincial Perspective on Climate Change

Authors:    Victor, Mark

Maine Policy Review 2(2): 13-17

Global climate change has garnered some media attention, but has failed to gather the attention of most governmental decision makers and the public. In an effort to advance concerns about the issue, the New England Governors and Eastern Canadian Premiers sponsored a three-day symposium on climate change last May 19-21 in Portland. At the symposium, scientists and public officials from both the U.S. and Canada explored the science of climate change, the potential implications and impact of climate change on this region, and the possible policy responses. Mark Victor [and James Bruce and Dean Marriot, this issue] reflecting the breadth of topics explored at the symposium, argues that the level of public and public policy decision makers’ awareness about climate change issues must be heightened, and decision makers must begin to deal collaboratively with the many serious challenges climate change is presenting to the region.

Electric Lifeline Policy in Maine

Authors:    Ballard, Steven; Faulkner, James; Morris, Charles; Nicoletti, Barbara Jean; Townsend, Ralph

Maine Policy Review 2(2): 51-63

Concern about the impact of high energy costs on the low-income and elderly citizens underlies Maine’s so-called “electric lifeline” programs, which modify rates to assist qualified customers with their electric bills. Recently, researchers at the Margaret Chase Smith Policy Center conducted an evaluation of Central Maine Power Company’s electric lifeline policy. This article, based on the findings of that evaluation, examines the many regulatory and social issues that have surfaced during Maine’s lifeline experience.

Advocacy and the Public Advocate

Authors:    Townsend, Ralph E.

Maine Policy Review 2(2): 90-91

Regulatory Updates: Public Utilities Commission

Maine Policy Review 2(2): 101-103

Examining Alternative Forms of Utility Regulation: The Incentives and Disincentives of the Regulatory Structure

Authors:    Gelder, Ralph; Dinan, Edward; Flanagan, David; Donahue, Joseph

Maine Policy Review 2(3): 16-34

The traditional form of regulating public utilities—command-and-control—has been found inadequate by some to cope with marketplace changes that have introduced competition into previously monopolistic markets. Alternative forms of regulation, particularly incentive regulation, have been developed in various areas of the nation in response to the new competitive utility environment. In these four short articles, former Maine Public Utilities Commission chair Ralph Gelder, New England Telephone Vice President for Maine, Edward Dinan, and Central Maine Power Company Vice President David Flanagan discuss these emergent utility issues. A fourth and quite different view of the present regulatory system and its alternatives is provided by Joseph Donahue, an Augusta attorney who frequently represents several major industries in utility proceedings.

Regulatory Updates

Authors:    Townsend, Ralph; Robinson, Ruth

Maine Policy Review 2(3): 105-110

1992

New Hampshire’s Siting Evaluation Committee for Energy Projects

Authors:    Cannata, Michael

Maine Policy Review 1(2): 28-30

The seeming paralysis in siting waste disposal facilities and other new facilities in Maine and other states underscores the difficulty of designing and implementing processes that will safeguard the environment and human health while sustaining economic development. Michael Cannata, chief engineer of the New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission, details the steps taken by New Hampshire’s leaders to ensure a responsive facility siting process for new energy projects.

Regulation of Electric Utilities: An Interview with Commissioner Elizabeth Paine

Authors:    Paine, Elizabeth

Maine Policy Review 1(2): 55-63

Elizabeth Paine has been a commissioner of the Maine Public Utilities Commission for three years. Her experience with the PUC goes back to 1981, when she joined the PUC staff as a financial analyst. Maine Policy Review is pleased to present this interview with Commissioner Paine on issues related to electric utility regulation in Maine.

Conference Reports: Public Utilities Research Center Annual Conference: Regulation as Art and Science

Authors:    Spruce, Christopher

Maine Policy Review 1(2): 85-87

1991

Planning Maine’s Energy Future

Authors:    Silkman, Richard H.; Flumerfelt, John M.

Maine Policy Review 1(1): 45-59

Secure and reasonably priced energy supplies have always been vital to the welfare ofMaine’s economy and its people.Maineresponded to the energy shocks of the 1970s with important state policies, designed in large part to reduce dependence on foreign oil. John Flumerfelt and Richard Silkman of the State Planning Office provide for us an overview of Maine’s recent history of energy use and an analysis of both past and future energy policies in Maine. Two alternatives perspectives on energy policy are provided by Beth Nagusky of the Natural Resources Council of Maine and Matthew Hunter of Central Maine Power [this issue].

Market Failure Requires Aggressive Action

Authors:    Nagusky, Beth A.

Maine Policy Review 1(1): 59-65

Secure and reasonably priced energy supplies have always been vital to the welfare of Maine’s economy and its people. Maine responded to the energy shocks of the 1970s with important state policies, designed in large part to reduce dependence on foreign oil. John Flumerfelt and Richard Silkman of the State Planning Office [this issue] provide an overview of Maine’s recent history of energy use and an analysis of both past and future energy policies in Maine. Beth Nagusky of the Natural Resources Council of Maine provides here an alternative perspective on energy policy.

Response: Real World Energy Policy

Authors:    Hunter, Matthew

Maine Policy Review 1(1): 65-70

Secure and reasonably priced energy supplies have always been vital to the welfare of Maine’s economy and its people. Maine responded to the energy shocks of the 1970s with important state policies, designed in large part to reduce dependence on foreign oil. John Flumerfelt and Richard Silkman of the State Planning Office [this issue] provide an overview of Maine’s recent history of energy use and an analysis of both past and future energy policies in Maine. Matthew Hunter of Central Maine Power provides here an alternative perspective on energy policy.

The Role of Public Utilities

Authors:    Briggs, Robert S.

Maine Policy Review 1(1): 113-118

The regulation of public utilities in Maine continues to evolve in response to changing economic, political and social forces. Not only has the structure of regulation of the electrical and telecommunications industry seen dramatic changes in the past 20 years, but it also is certain the next decade will see equally fundamental changes. Maine Policy Review invited three key participants in Maine’s regulatory arena to interpret the changes of the past two decades and what future changes we can expect. This article provides the perspectives of Robert Briggs of Bangor Hydro-Electric.

Redefining Utilities: Regulatory Change for Electric and Telephone Companies in Maine since 1980

Authors:    Ward, Stephen G.

Maine Policy Review 1(1): 118-124

The regulation of public utilities in Maine continues to evolve in response to changing economic, political and social forces. Not only has the structure of regulation of the electrical and telecommunications industry seen dramatic changes in the past 20 years, but it also is certain the next decade will see equally fundamental changes. Maine Policy Review invited three key participants in Maine’s regulatory arena to interpret the changes of the past two decades and what future changes we can expect. This article provides the perspectives of Public Advocate Steve Ward.

Upcoming at the Regulatory Commissions

Authors:    Wood, Linda; Townsend, Ralph

Maine Policy Review 1(1): 151-156

Top