The Margaret Chase Smith Essays

“NIMBY” or Citizen Participation?

by Bruce Clary NIMBY, or “Not in My Backyard,” refers to the phenomenon of local residents expressing strong opposition to projects being advanced in the name of the public good. At the heart of such objections are the perceived negative consequences of the proposed project, whether that project be a dam for the production of […]

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The Power to Tax; The Need to Provide

by Dennis King, President Acadia Hospital, Bangor ME On the eve of its adjournment, the Maine Legislature appropriately approved the tax abatement for the state’s largest employer, Bath Iron Works. What makes this move so incongruous is that the same session had actively considered removing long-standing tax exemptions for most of Maine’s nonprofit charities–a group […]

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Ethics and Election of 1996

by Steve Ballard The real story of the 1996 elections, in Maine and nationally, has less to do with winners and losers and more to do with citizen reactions to the process. This point has been missed in most post-election critiques. Campaigns have become controlled by monied interests, candidates are immune to a serious discussion […]

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One Question at a Time, Please!

by Chris Spruce …politics in the broad sense of the term is best conducted in this country (as) a matter of give and take, recognizing that the perfect may be the enemy of good, recognizing that in a democratic society no one faction can get everything, or nothing…” —Theodore C. Sorenson, former adviser to President […]

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Welfare Reform: Unresolved Issues

by Deirdre Mageean In 1993, President Clinton made a campaign promise to “end welfare as we know it,” thus he opened the floodgates of change and prompted legislative initiatives to reform a welfare system in which the majority of Americans have lost faith. With the recent Senate and House bills on welfare reform, which now […]

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The Divided Information Superhighway

by Robert Kuttner If you think America has become a nation of haves and have-nots, just wait. The arrival of the much-heralded information superhighway will only worsen the trend. In the 1980s, America became more unequal for several reasons. A factory economy with a broad, blue-collar middle class increasingly gave way to a service economy—a […]

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