Indigenous Voices in Maine

In commemoration of Indigenous Peoples’ Day on October 10, 2022, this episode features Gail Dana-Sacco reading her article entitled “Indigenous Voices Charting a Course Beyond the Bicentennial: Eba gwedji jik-sow-dul-din-e wedji gizi nan-ul-dool-tehigw (Let’s try to listen to each other so that we can get to know each other)” from Maine Policy Review’s special issue commemorating Maine’s bicentennial.

Credit for intro and outro music goes to Allen Sockabasin, who advocated for the restoration of the Passamaquoddy language throughout his lifetime through his music and his teaching.

Transcript

[00:00:00] Eric Miller: In commemoration of Indigenous People’s Day on October 10th, we will be hosting Gail Dana-Sacco on today’s episode with her reading of her article entitled “Indigenous Voices Charting a Course Beyond the Bicentennial”.

Let’s try to listen to each other so that we can get to know each other. Gail Dana-Sacco became the first Passamaquoddy to earn a PhD when she completed her doctorate in Health Policy and Management at Johns Hopkins University in 2009.

Today her work centers on advancing wolibmowsawogon a world in which indigenous peoples lands and languages can thrive.

This is the Maine Policy Matters podcast from the Margaret Chase Smith Policy Center at the University of Maine. I’m Eric Miller, research associate at the center. On each episode of Maine Policy Matters, we discuss public policy issues relevant to the state of Maine. The article covered in this episode was published in Volume 29, number two of Maine Policy Review, a peer-reviewed academic journal published by the Policy Center here is Gail Dana-Sacco.

[00:01:19] Read along with Gail Dana-Sacco in her article in Maine Policy Review.

[00:48:35] Eric Miller: What you just heard was Gail Dana-Sacco’s reading of her article, “Indigenous Voices Charting a Course Beyond the Bicentennial”.

Maine Policy Review is a peer reviewed academic journal published by the Margaret Chase Smith Policy Center. For all citations for date provided in this episode, please refer to the original article in Maine Policy Review. The editorial team for Maine Policy Review is made up of Joyce Rumery, Linda Silka and Barbara Harrity. Jonathan Rubin directs the policy center. A thank you to Jayson Heim and Kathryn Swacha, script writers for Maine Policy Matters, and to Daniel Soucier, our production consultant. In two weeks, we will be hosting William D. Adams, the 10th chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, for a reading of his essay, “The Urgency of Democracy”.

We’d like to thank you for listening to Maine Policy Matters from the Margaret Chase Smith Policy Center at the University of Maine. You can find us online by searching Maine Policy Matters on your web browser. If you enjoyed this episode, please follow us on your preferred social media platform and stay updated on new episode releases.

I am Eric Miller. Thanks for listening and please join us next time on Maine Policy Matters.